The Addiction

The Addiction

Directed by Abel Ferrara

Philosophy student Kathleen is dragged into an alleyway on her way home from class by Casanova and bitten on the neck. She quickly falls ill, but realises this isn't any ordinary disease when she develops an aversion to daylight and a thirst for human blood... From Abel Ferrara, an independent vampire essential.

Philosophy student Kathleen is dragged into an alleyway on her way home from class by Casanova and bitten on the neck. She quickly falls ill but realises this isn't any ordinary disease when she develops an aversion to daylight and a thirst for human blood...

Cast: Lili Taylor, Christopher Walken

Member Reviews

I am so surprised by this movie. It is thoroughly enjoyable. Loved that it was in black and white, and due to the low budget it was simple in it's nature which added to the appeal. Like previous reviews, a very different take on the subject matter.

victorianlady
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1 week ago

The film is well described by its title: Addiction. You can interpret it as an urban tale of vampirism, a metaphor for substance addiction, a probing analysis of philosophy/philosophers, or a construct of good and evil. It's all there, and the fact that it's filmed in black and white underscores some of those thematic elements. In short -- following a vampiric ambush on a NYC sidewalk, Lili Taylor gradually transforms from an ambitious and enthusiastic philosophy doctoral candidate to a devoid of conscience being who recites "life is futile" passages from a sea of historical philosophers. She spends the rest of her time roaming the streets for her next fix. After she wipes the blood from her lips, you know how the story goes (victims turn into vampires and amass -- although the victims don't seem to comprehend the fact that they can choose to ward off their attacker and the addiction that follows). The supporting cast includes several Soprano stars: Edie Falco, Michael Imperioli, and Annabella Sciorra. Of course, Christopher Walken is Christopher Walken, regardless of his character's name. While his screen time is about as brief as the other supporting parts, it is the most memorable. I didn't find the ending to be ambiguous. Just think about what you just watched unfold and it will become clear. Oh, a warning -- several of the characters attend an art exhibition that contains lingering and large images of Holocaust victims as well as those discovered at the aftermath of My Lai.

Behindthewords
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1 week ago

Loved this, Christopher Walkin was perfect in this role and it was an interesting take on the vampire movie. Recommended.

mossroadster
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2 weeks ago

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Adamnation
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3 weeks ago

This film has an incredible tone that is sustained throughout. It was clearly done with a small budget, and the aesthetic of the film worked within those constraints. This might be one of the most unique vampire films I have seen as a result.

DeathByDigital
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3 weeks ago